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Life goes on in Whitebite Inn, Mokao because the lockdown keeps passengers away.

During the Judy Death Level 4 lockdown, White Beat Inn opens for two hours each day to provide milk, bread and eggs to Mokao locals.

Provided

During the Judy Death Level 4 lockdown, White Beat Inn opens for two hours each day to provide milk, bread and eggs to Mokao locals.

At this time of year, Judy Death would usually fry her famous White Bite fritters for customers, but instead, she’s just cooking for her family.

Death, which owns Whitebite in Mokao, is open for two hours each morning to provide essential items such as bread and milk to locals in the small coastal town.

But she is missing out on the hundreds of passengers she usually sees, stopping for food as they travel on State Highway 3 between Taranaki and Waikato.

Death thinks that when she thinks of lockdown, these are the lazy days she will remember.

“It’s quiet, really. We’ve been here half an hour this morning. No one has come here. And out of the ordinary, don’t get up at 6 in the morning as usual. I’m sleeping until 7 in the morning.

In general, the white bait season is in full swing, with the town near the border of Taranaki and Waiko bustling with people who live near the fish for seasonal pleasure.

In addition to running cafes, where whitebite fritters are a specialty all year round, Death usually runs the New Zealand Post franchise, but can’t do so under the restrictions of Coved 4.

Lana Baron, manager of White House, is waiting for some customers.

Simon O’Connor / Things.

Lana Baron, manager of White House, is waiting for some customers.

“We’re 80 percent below normal. It’s in, it’s out, and masks are essential.

She and her husband Wall took over the business and moved their two teenage daughters above New Plymouth during Level 3 last year, so the weird way of working is not entirely new.

“In the months leading up to the lockdown, business was going well,” he said.

“That’s it. I’ll take care of it. There’s just me and another staff member for security. There’s really not enough work for the two of us.”

“The locals are very nice. They are coming for milk, bread and eggs. I think they are happy that I have opened them to bring them here, otherwise they will have to go to Urnivi for half an hour.”

Her two daughters, Georgia and Macy, are at home studying online.

“She is in Girls’ High and the school has been amazing. She is still in school. [online] 9 to 3

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