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19: Less than 3% of students go to school during level 3.

Schools across the country reopened on Wednesday, but 97% of students stayed home.

Face-to-face classes for the children of essential workers resumed at 1797 schools in south Auckland after the Cove 19 Alert Level 3.

Of the 1734 schools that provided attendance data to the Ministry of Education (MoE), only 2.7% (12,600) of the total roll attended, while 39% (676) had less than 10 students on site. Reported

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The regional error in school attendance statistics is as follows.

  • Waikato – 1619 (2.4%)
  • Bay / Wireki – 1542 (2.7%)
  • Hawke’s Bay / Tiruhiti – 1115 (2.8%)
  • Taranaki / Wanganui / Manawatu – 1202 (2.3%)
  • Wellington – 1,543 (1.6%)
  • Nelson / Marlborough / West Coast – 1,080 (3.8%)
  • Canterbury / Chatham Islands – 2,954 (3.4%)
  • Otago / Southland – 1,546 (3.2%)

Perry Rush, president of the New Zealand Principals Federation (NZPF), said principals are working hard to support distance education and the “hybrid distance / face-to-face model” in Auckland.

“Return to Level 3 in many areas has once again seen a very low return rate for students, with an average of five per cent of the school rolls going to the physical school site,” he said.

“It underscores how seriously parents are taking the various delta threats.”

There is a need to be “more explicit” about the use of masks in schools, and Rush said it is “disappointing” that teachers have not been given preference for vaccinations “because of the nature of the job.”

Perry Rush, president of the New Zealand Principals Federation (NZPF), says schools have responded well to online and face-to-face learning challenges.

MONIQUE FORD / Fairfax NZ / Things.

Perry Rush, president of the New Zealand Principals Federation (NZPF), says schools have responded well to online and face-to-face learning challenges.

“I am impressed with the sheer potential and creativity of the teaching workforce in support of remote and hybrid learning,” he said.

“Exclusive lockdown remote learning websites that schools are creating for their students, or digital storytelling or fitness programs, or zoom reading lessons, showcasing teachers’ commitment and abilities.”

Melania Weber, president of the teaching union New Zealand Post Primary Teachers Association / TVWingroa (PPTA), said there was not a “large number” of teachers returning to third-grade secondary schools this week.

“Most schools seem to be running only a few bubbles, and they are often overseen by senior school leaders who are involved in students learning online,” he said.

“This government is taking very precautionary measures against the Cowboys, and we have to make sure that they do not reopen schools unless it is safe to do so.

Melania Weber, president of the New Zealand Post Primary Teachers Association / TVWingroa (PPTA), says teachers need clear guidance on whether school holidays will be transferred.

Provided

Melania Weber, president of the New Zealand Post Primary Teachers Association / TVWingroa (PPTA), says teachers need clear guidance on whether school holidays will be transferred.

“Schools are big workplaces where social distance is very difficult, and so it’s not surprising that people are upset.”

Have done Demand for postponing the next school holidays, And Weber said the lack of confidence is “increasing anxiety” among teachers.

“It’s a good idea for teachers and parents to give a clear ‘yes’ or ‘no’ answer so they can plan,” he said.

“It’s one of those decisions that will fail to please everyone, but avoiding it will not help anyone.”

A spokesman for the union NZEI Te Riu Roa said it “widely” supported the government’s move in line with public health guidelines.

“Our members have told us that they feel they and their schools are better prepared this year than last,” he said.

“As a result, they are able to feel more confident about what they need to do at each warning level.”

Attendance figures for early childhood education (ECE) were high.

Able to open at level 3 of 2784 ECEs, 2078 responded to the MoE (approximately 75 75%). On Wednesday, 8418 (7.4%) children participated, while 34% had less than 10 children on site.

Abacus Montessori Nursery and Preschool in Christchurch was among the 2,784 early childhood education centers across the country that will open on Level 3 on Wednesday.

Stacey Squares / Things.

Abacus Montessori Nursery and Preschool in Christchurch was among the 2,784 early childhood education centers across the country that will open on Level 3 on Wednesday.

“Tamariki (children) and young people should learn at home,” a MOE spokesman said on Alert Level 3.

“Schools and cohorts are open to children whose parents or carers need to go to work and have no option to take care of the children,” he said.

“Early learning centers can be opened for the care of children whose parents need to go to work. Play centers and playgroups remain closed.

The regional error of the ECE attendance data is as follows.

  • Waikato – 990 (5.6%)
  • Bay / Wireki – 661 (4.5%)
  • Hawke’s Bay / Tiruhiti 541 (5.8%)
  • Tarnaki / Wanganui / Manawatu 494 (3.9%)
  • Wellington 1067 (5.1%)
  • Nelson / Marlborough / West Coast 505 (8.6%)
  • Canterbury / Chatham Islands 3453 (16.5%)
  • Otago / Southland 707 (6.6%)

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