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Cove 19 New Zealand: Vaccine pressure and declining flexibility have made this lockdown difficult.

Psychologists say the fatigue of the lockdown, the lack of flexibility after dealing with epidemics for more than a year, and widespread concerns and questions about the Covid 19 vaccine have led to the lockdown for many. Made more pressure.

“Vaccination was not a hot topic during the lockdown last year – it is now. It’s a big topic,” said Auckland psychologist Sarah Chatton.

“We worry about vaccinations, we worry about the effects on our bodies, we worry about it not happening, and we worry about it happening. They destabilize thoughts. have been.

The Kiwis have quickly felt the pinch since the sudden and abrupt lockdown began four weeks ago.

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The Kiwis have quickly felt the pinch since the sudden and abrupt lockdown began four weeks ago.

“So these are all things – the answer questions and the multitude of different variables – that have come up in this latest lockdown.”

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Some Kiwis are worried that the government may have to wait to replenish the vaccine stockpile, so there is a sense of urgency or even a fear of disappearance.

Others may be hurt. Trypanophobia Fear of needles -And there is serious concern around the idea of ​​vaccination, while others are concerned about possible side effects, or the long-term effectiveness of the vaccine.

Wellington Clinical Psychologist Karen Nemo acknowledged that people are struggling more mentally and emotionally this time around, and that the uncertainty surrounding vaccine delivery is having a major impact.

“It’s especially difficult on Aucklanders, but there’s usually more caution, fatigue, anxiety and frustration,” Nemo said.

“Vaccines, and their availability, have increased stress and distribution.”

These new triggers of stress come at a time when the Kiwis are also feeling tired and worried about the fact that Covid 19 will continue to affect our daily lives for a long time to come.

Feelings of tension and anxiety are more widespread as the Kiwis struggle to cope mentally with the latest lockdown and alert level restrictions of Cove 19.

Engine Accurate / UNS Pillash.

Feelings of tension and anxiety are more widespread as the Kiwis struggle to cope mentally with the latest lockdown and alert level restrictions of Cove 19.

Initially, our team of five million largely accepted the challenge of trying to eradicate the virus, but the appearance of Delta tensions, and another prolonged lockdown, has left many frustrated.

Nemo said, “The last lockdown was the fear of the unknown, but it was new to us – a new challenge, something to connect us as New Zealand, the feeling that maybe we can do better than other countries. “

“This time the challenge feels flat and there is nothing new. We know what lockdown means and we’re on it. That’s why we don’t see so much sour dough baking or teddy bears in the windows or even in the streets.

Chaiton agrees, suggesting that New Zealanders have been deprived of much of their commitment, which has diminished our energy and our ability to deal with many worries and uncertainties.

“We were full of flexibility when the first lockdown happened,” Cheeton said.

“Now, 18 months later, our resilience is low. Our emotional bank account is gone. We don’t have enough time out of this mindset to replenish these resources.”

“After the clear impact of last year’s lockdown, many of us are hopeful that New Zealand will be free of cowardice,” Nemo added.

However, the sudden way we went into lockdown four weeks ago after the Delta eruption made many of us feel “here we go again”.

“We’re realizing now that we’re going to have to stay with Cowid longer than we believe,” Nemo said.

“The last time we thought the sky was going to be clear, but the cloud is not going anywhere – it’s a big mental challenge and a different mindset is needed.

Wellington Clinical Psychologist Karen Nemo says the latest lockdown has affected our resilience as we realize that Covid 19 will continue to affect our daily lives for a long time to come.

Victoria Birkin Shaw

Wellington Clinical Psychologist Karen Nemo says the latest lockdown has affected our resilience as we realize that Covid 19 will continue to affect our daily lives for a long time to come.

“The Kiwis are stupid, but now we are being asked a lot. The economy is booming, there is a lot of personal struggle, freedom and travel feel far away. It’s hard to plan and wait for the things that eat with hope.

The good news is that there are steps we can all take to maintain our mental health and control our anxiety levels – and they should be familiar to most of us by now.

It is important for Kiwis to stay connected with their friends and loved ones when people are separated, Aucklanders are still below Grade 4, while the rest of the country enjoys Level 2 comparative freedom.

Daily exercise is another great exercise. Helping Kiwis feel fresh and alert both body and mind, as well as making time for your favorite things.

“We need to connect, and we need to keep our bodies physically active, and we need to treat ourselves,” Cheaton said.

“Don’t just tighten it up – talk and connect with people. Zoom, Skype – use whatever you can and what works for you.

“If running, or gym, or exercising is not your thing, then walking is very easy. It requires you to go out with your mask, practice social distance, and look at your surroundings and scenery. ۔

“The advice is simple, but it’s about doing it regularly and asking for the resources, information and advice you last got and reusing it. Don’t forget it.”

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