Automotive

The school students take the DOC hut under their wing.

Lake Rototti School students have adopted six Bank Babies Hut near St. Arnaud in Mount Richmond Forest Park, including help keep the DOC's hut clean and store wood.

Supply / Supply

Lake Rototti School students have adopted six Bank Babies Hut near St. Arnaud in Mount Richmond Forest Park, including help keep the DOC’s hut clean and store wood.

How to check a water tank and make sure the wood doesn’t run out is one of the most practical lessons a child can take away from adopting a Department of Protection (DOC) hut near their school.

But it was hoped that five-year-old students would appreciate the importance of caring for the desert around them.

Along with Nelson Lakes National Park and Mount Richmond Forest Park, Lake Rototti School in St. Arnaud has taken on the task of helping keep Babs Hut – on the south edge of Jungle Park – in good order.

From next year, the school’s 23 students will begin cleaning and maintenance of six bank huts, including cleaning windows and benches, picking up trash, replacing mattress premises and any more complex repairs to the DOC. to inform.

Read more:
* Cove 19: The children gather the sheep and make them thick under the sight of ‘disappointing’ snow.
* Rafting crews restore huts along five remote southern islands.
* Why is Nelson Lakes New Zealand’s Best National Park?

It is hoped that students at Lake Rototi School will be able to get out of Babes Hut at least twice a year.

Supply / Supply

It is hoped that students at Lake Rototi School will be able to get out of Babes Hut at least twice a year.

Principal Mike Allen said he has a list of DOC works that inspect the hut every two years.

He hopes the children will be able to leave twice a year.

“We are teaching children how to be socially responsible, and we are also giving them the opportunity to care for a part of our community that is not cared for very much.”

With 4WD access to the hut on Top House Road, Allen said, the youngest students in the full primary will be able to get there easily.

John Waderspoon, operations manager for DOC Nelson Lakes, said it was a “very decent climb” to the hut.

Having a 4WD track also means the school can easily carry extra food and safety and care equipment, he said.

He predicted that giving students the responsibility of the hut would create a “great sense of ownership” in children and their families.

“It simply came to our notice then.

“It can be as long as the school likes it.”

“People can go to the hut on foot or on a motorbike at any time, and a key to a car can be given in the summer months,” he said.

Waterspoon said this was the first time Lake Rototti School had done so while other locations on the South Island that had adopted the local DOC hut.

He and Allen saw the kind of standard work that the DOC did during its annual checks on huts such as Babies Hut.

“There’s no doubt there will be other things they see when they’re there, so it’s great for us to see their eyes.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *