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Wellington Today, September 9: Lockdown delays thousands of surgeries and scans, cafe owner wants government employees back in office

Entering Wellington is the second day of Level 2.

Monique Ford / equipment

Entering Wellington is the second day of Level 2.

Kia ora whānau. Here are the latest news, updates and events about Dominion Post pages and Capital.

6.30am: Wellington Weather.

Wellington residents have light mornings and afternoons. Fine with some clouds in the afternoon. Strong northwest directions will form in the morning, accelerating to 110 kilometers per hour by evening. Strong winds are forecast for Friday evening and a maximum temperature of 15 degrees Celsius will be observed throughout the night.

The Met Service issued a strong wind warning for Virarpa and Tararawa districts, forecasting speeds of 130 kilometers per hour overnight until 9pm on Friday.

From the pages of Dominion Post.:

The lockdown delayed surgery and scans for 37,000 patients.

A man with bowel cancer is among 37,000 patients who are facing treatment delays due to a nationwide lockdown, as a physician warns that people could die.

Health reporter Rachel Thomas reports the heartbreaking condition of Auckland man Stephen, who has stage 4 bowel cancer, and had his CT scan canceled at the last minute.

Dr. Frank Frasier, medical adviser at Bowl Cancer NZ, warns that people will die if hospitals do not increase screening and diagnostic tests, such as colonoscopes.

Read on Full story here.

Thousands of surgeries and scans have been delayed due to the Covid 19 lockdown.

Robert Kitchen / Staff

Thousands of surgeries and scans have been delayed due to the Covid 19 lockdown.

The first day under Delta Level 2 is really devastating for Wellington Cafe China.

Owners of 24 cafes in Wellington are expecting more foot traffic and the return of office workers soon as the first day under Level 2 warning is truly devastating.

With the reopening of schools, parents can return to the office, which Mojo Coffee chief executive Pierre van Harden said may need to promote central city hospitality venues.

All Mojo cafes closed quickly, and some staff members were sent home before closing.

Van Harden said most locations traded between 10 and 25 percent before the lockdown.

“We were ready for people returning to the office today. We expected it to be a little slower based on the previous lockdown, but it was really disastrous from a commercial point of view.

Read on Sophie Cornish’s full story here.

Pierre van Harden, who owns Mojo Cafe in Wellington, said the first day was under alert level 2. "fearsome" For trade.

Jericho Rock Archer / Things.

Pierre van Harden, owner of Mojo Cafe in Wellington, said the first day of Alert Level 2 was “terrible” for business.

Challenges of planning a major arts festival in an epidemic.

Mag Williams is the Executive Director of Tohiri: Writes about the festivals and experiences, the audience and the reception of artists when he announces the 2022 Outrea New Zealand Festival of the Arts:

The positive response we receive from audiences and artists is a reminder of what arts events like festivals mean these days.

For the audience, it is hoped to gather with friends, family and community, something to look forward to.

For artists, this is a commitment to future work at a time of constant cancellation and rescheduling.

For us, and many arts companies, events and venues, that’s just what we do. We keep moving, we embrace, we stir. The show, as they say, should continue – an ecosystem of artists, practitioners, staff and crew, venues and hospitality.

Follow the link to A complete piece of Mag Williams.

Mag Williams writes about the challenges facing the Ottawa New Zealand Festival of the Arts.

Supplied.

Mag Williams writes about the challenges facing the Ottawa New Zealand Festival of the Arts.

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