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The council has agreed to find a new site for its stinking compost plant.

Living Earth Composting Plant in Bramley, Christchurch.

Christchurch City Council

Living Earth Composting Plant in Bramley, Christchurch.

A smelly composting plant that has been bothering neighbors for years will be relocated if Christchurch City Council finds a new location.

Residents of the Bromley area. The council has been working for years to fix it. The stench from the council’s own organic processing plant on Metro Place.

At a meeting Thursday, councilors agreed to look at possible new sites as well as new technologies.

Neighbors have described the local stench as “ripe and dead animals” and “rotten fish” and said the plant should never have been planted there.

Read more:
* Stinky compost can be moved to the plant because complaints keep coming.
* Christchurch Council will spend .5 21.5 million to combat the stench of bromelain.
* The plan to eliminate the stench on the outskirts of Christchurch failed.

The Living Earth Plant is located on the Metro Place near Bromley.

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The Living Earth Plant is located on Metro Place, near Bromley.

The Chinese-owned private company operates the plant for Long Earth Council.

Environment Canterbury (ECan) has given the council until February to stop the stench from the site.

ECan issued live land with 67 non-compliant odor notices in the six months to the end of May. During this time it received approximately 50,1750 reports or odor complaints in Bromley.

Late last year, the council agreed to completely redevelop the plant, shut it down completely and upgrade its biofilters.

However, the tender budget came in at over 21 21.5 million, prompting council staff to submit a report to councilors outlining all options, including rebuilding it elsewhere.

After Thursday’s council meeting, Mayor Lian Dalzel said he needed to “explore alternative sites for organic processing that could serve a wider area than Christchurch.”

The composting plant processes 50,000 tons of organic waste annually.

Joe Johnson / Things.

The composting plant processes 50,000 tons of organic waste annually.

“It makes sense to look at alternative options. This means looking for other suitable development sites that could be on council-owned land, heavy industrial zones or rural land.

Dalziel said he was committed to finding a “cost-effective and reasonable purpose solution”.

The decision follows a presentation by Tracy McLellan, MP for Banks Peninsula, who said the council should work better for residents who are locked in their homes because of the stench from the council-owned facility.

McLellan, whose voters enter some of the affected neighborhoods, said she wanted to clear up any misunderstandings that have affected very few residents.

He said the problem was deep and widespread and the plant was close to homes, schools and communities.

Tracy McLellan, a Member of Parliament for Bank of Pennsylvania, says the Broomely community has been burned because of concerns about its stench.

John Kirk-Anderson / Things.

Tracy McLellan, a Member of Parliament for Bank of Pennsylvania, says the Broomely community has been burned because of concerns about its stench.

“There is a lack of trust in the community in any of the reduction plans. It has been repeatedly stated that there is no problem.

“This community is bright with gas and deserves the best solution. It has been going on for a long time and the community needs some restraint on this issue.

Councilors agreed to give staff six months to explore new sites and other options. If the staff could not find a good alternative, they did not refuse to redevelop the existing site.

The plant opened in 2009 and handles about 50,000 tons of waste each year, spreading in long lines for three to four months and turning into compost.

Late last year, under pressure from residents, the council told Long Earth to stop dumping animal carcasses through the plant.

By then, the site had accepted shipments of food producers, such as poultry or fish processors, as well as green bean waste from homes.

Joseph Johnson / Staff

Broomley in East Christchurch may be New Zealand’s stinky suburb, but after years of complaints, authorities are still fighting to get rid of Peter Pong. (First published January 2020)

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