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Aotearoa celebrates Te reo Māori together in an instant.

Thousands of voices are singing Waita in Motu and around the world, and when the Maori language moment begins, Theo Maori is speaking.

Autorva’s indigenous language celebration began at 12 midnight on Tuesday, with at least 188,000 people dropping out in support of the Torah Vahri IT Review Maori – the Maori Language Commission’s Maori Language Limit 2021.

In her Keikohe salon, personal space, Mara Pekeri listens to Vita on the radio as she cuts Koya’s hair, which she likes about the personal attention she receives in her salon.

Kupu Māori (Maori words) are reflected in the mirror as its customers and staff describe their day.

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Carrying Carrero with her clients as they cut their hair adds to the Maori language moment, Mara Pikri during 2021.

Provided

Carrying Carrero with her clients as they cut their hair adds to the Maori language moment, Mara Pikri during 2021.

An annual affiliation for her, Ngopohi and Ngati Watwa Vahin said she learns more when she comes close to Wiki Ot Rio Maori.

“A lot of my clients like to talk. It’s really cool because all the coyotes are really comfortable. I try to use it as much as possible.

“I’m not fluent, but you’ll find all the old coyotes and they’ll just go away, so they’ll talk to you and you’ll pick it up.”

The goal for 2021 was to double the number of people attending the moment, up from 1 million to 2 million last year.

Nagahavi Apanoi, chief executive of T Tora Veri IT Rio Maori, said that 2020 was the biggest celebration of T Rio Maori so far.

“In the midst of a global epidemic, New Zealanders have shown us that their support for T-Rio is as strong as ever.

“More than eight out of 10 people in Colmar Brenton’s poll late last year told us that they consider T-Rio a matter of pride and part of their identity as New Zealanders.

“It’s not just what T’Rio Maori said, it’s also what Autoriva said.”

Tahir Nawaz has admitted in all aspects of his life that in all aspects of his life MÄ ??

Kevin Stent / Things.

Tahir Nawaz has admitted in all aspects of his life that in all aspects of his life MÄ ??

Tahir Nawaz is watching videos sent to him by his colleagues where he sings Vita or practices Rio Maori to recognize the Maori language moment as part of a cultural trust group under Correction.

Nawaz, who emigrated from Singapore to Aotearoa 22 years ago, has been at the forefront of learning and encouraging others in everything he has done to acknowledge the hardships of the land.

We are proud to be here and we want to thank the land and respect the language.

“Anyone who does small things to support this moment will see the effects in the future.”

In Tamaki Makurao, Mary Rollston-Galagher sees her camland relay from Tamariki to a meme by zooming in from her Buckland’s early childhood center.

Still, under Alert Level 4, young seekers cannot gather to celebrate Maori Language Week or this moment, but that has not stopped them from celebrating again.

As a kayak, Rolston Gallagher says it is his responsibility to help children feel comfortable with the Maori language so that they can take it with them when they grow up.

Mary Rollston-Gallagher has helped Young Explorers make her chemistry a center papaya for the Maori Language Moment, 2021.

Provided

Mary Rollston-Gallagher has helped Young Explorers make her chemistry a center papaya for the Maori Language Moment, 2021.

This is his way of helping to heal the trauma of Rio Bang’s past, which has been removed from his tapona.

Rolston Gallagher said, “As many New Zealanders, we have lost contact with Papatanoko and this has helped me regain my Wakawahunagtang and feel confident in revealing myself. ۔ “

On his Tue Rio trip, he decides to call his father, Papi, to increase his use of T-Rio in his home life.

“There is a lot of trauma from the past and we need to do more, but we are taking steps.”

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