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Covid 19: Move Auckland’s Level 4 Lockdown to ‘Right’ – Experts

The move to keep Auckland on alert level 4 for another seven days has been welcomed by health experts, who say we have only one chance. Covid-19 epidemic under control.

The cabinet has decided in principle. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced Monday that the region will remain at Level 4 lockdown until 11.59pm on Tuesday, September 21. Meanwhile, the rest of the country will remain on alert level 2.

The expansion means Auckland will have spent as much time on Alert Level 4 this year as it did during the March / April 2020 epidemic.

Auckland will remain on alert level 4 for another seven days, its longest period of lockdown since the onset of the epidemic.

Ricky Wilson / Stuff / Equipment.

Auckland will remain on alert level 4 for another seven days, its longest period of lockdown since the onset of the epidemic.

Although swallowing is a difficult pill for many people who find lockdown very difficult, “the alternative is much worse,” experts say.

Read more:
* Cove 19: Level 4 expansion could be a “fatal blow” for Auckland businesses.
* Cowade 19 New Zealand: No Alert Level Changed as Jacinda Ardern says Lockdown Has Not Done Yet
* Covid 19: Mystery Matters Investigate the Seven Auckland ‘Suburbs of Interest’.

Although it was difficult, the University of Auckland’s microbiologist Dr Seokie Wiles said it was “really a relief” that the lockdown had been extended to improve Auckland’s chances of spreading.

The Kiwis just needed to look beyond Tasman to see what could happen “when you don’t nail it,” as in New South Wales. There were more than 1,200 new cases on Monday., she said.

Wells said Aucklanders would have to keep an eye on the prize: “We just have to live with it.”

Dr. Sioux Wiles admits that it is really difficult to live in an extended lockdown, but says that the alternative is too bad.

Abigail Dogarty / Things.

Dr. Sioux Wiles admits that it is really difficult to live in an extended lockdown, but says that the alternative is too bad.

“We know it’s really difficult, but with just a few weeks of restrictions, it should work,” he said.

He urged everyone with symptoms, no matter how mild, to take the test: “It’s all over us.”

“It’s encouraging that they weren’t on a large scale,” Wiles said. Of unconnected transactions He said that now it was a matter of understanding which transmission chain was there.

“We know that sometimes these epidemics have a long tail. We only need one case where we started.

“It’s much better to get it the first time, to go much faster and get out of the lockdown,” Wiles said.

“I know we don’t want to be here, but we don’t want to be an NSW either.”

Te Pūnaha Matatini, the moderator of Covid 19, Professor Michael Planck, was “totally” in favor of the move. Raise the current level of alert across the country..

Recent The emergence of ‘mystery’ cases. He said it was suggested that there could be very few cases in the Auckland community that had not yet been found and that this could trigger a “resurgence”.

The modeling results suggest that it may take up to two weeks to see the effect of resuscitation in case numbers – by then the number of victims could be much higher.

Michael Planck, a mathematics professor at the University of Canterbury's Cowboys 19, said it could take two weeks to see the effect of rebirth in matters, which could push us back.  They call to increase the current alert level settings

Provided

Michael Planck, a mathematics professor at the University of Canterbury’s Cowboys 19, said it could take two weeks to see the effects of regeneration in matter, which could push us back. He was “fully supportive” of the call to increase the current alert level settings.

“It will take us weeks back.”

He said the fact that authorities have decided in principle to move Auckland to Level 3 from next Wednesday shows that public health teams are “increasingly confident” that the epidemic is slowly coming under control.

“Given the number of unrelated cases and contagious cases in the community going down over the next week, this is a realistic possibility.”

This was heard by Professor Michael Baker, an epidemiologist, who said the current answer was “correct”.

Dougal Sutherland, a clinical psychologist at Victoria University of Wellington, said this was a time when people “really had to dig deep into their reservoirs”.

“When things get really difficult, go back to the basics,” he said.

Sutherland advised people in Auckland to have a good structure for their day – getting up and going to bed at regular times, and dividing their days into manageable parts.

He also said it was “necessary” for Aucklanders to dedicate at least once or twice a day to doing something for their own well-being, and to make sure they had mercy on themselves.

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