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How much garbage load: The city councilor takes out the first garbage bag for the year.

Monday was a big day for Dunedin Councilor: Garbage Day.

After nearly eight months of hard work to reduce his household waste, Steve Walker finally placed a black garbage bag under his Port Chilmers drive on Monday morning.

By mid-January, the bag had grown a little bigger every few weeks.

“We could have made it by the end of the year, but the lockdown has changed what we’re buying unfortunately,” Walker said.

Read more:
* A councilor who produces only two bags of garbage a year.
* A fire broke out in a car between Queen Stone and Dunedin on State Highway 8.
* Comparing the price of garbage around New Zealand – why the difference?

Dunedin Councilor Steve Walker has filled only one garbage bag so far this year.

Steve Walker / Provided

Dunedin Councilor Steve Walker has filled only one garbage bag so far this year.

Walker and his wife, Liana Machado, used refillable containers for shopping, and tried to reuse items so they wouldn’t land.

But lockdown means the couple has fewer options when it comes to product packaging.

Walker spoke at a council meeting in June about his recycling efforts. When councilors agreed to introduce wheel bins for general waste. Replacing the unpopular bag system. New wheelbarrows will be available in 2023.

Walker and his wife, Liana Machado, have reduced their total waste to just two bags a year.

Always make blue / stuff.

Walker and his wife, Liana Machado, have reduced their total waste to just two bags a year.

A fortnight after the meeting, Equipment It was an honor to gossip through a 45-liter bag. Since the beginning of the year, Walker and Machado have been slowly adding rubbish.

The bag was now heading for landfilling, but the couple hoped they would continue to improve their waste reduction efforts and eventually become zero waste.

Walker acknowledged the location he was in – he had no children and had the means to obtain products from local specialty stores – but he hoped his efforts could inspire others.

It wasn’t always easy because the “stench” started coming long before the garbage bag was full.

In addition to their efforts to reduce waste, the couple regularly cycled to Dunedin, stopped cutting their lawns, installed solar panels, and double glazed their windows.

World Bank in 2018. New Zealand has been named the 10th waste-eating country in the world. Per capita, each kiwi produces an average of 3.6 kg of waste per day.

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