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Life Story: Calvin Heaney, Pioneer Cameraman and Fast Devotee.

I’tikaf: Calvin Heaney fell in love with racing as a boy, the moment he stepped in. Aranui Speedway. In Christ Church

The smell of methanol burning, the murmurs of the racers hitting mounds of dirt in the air as if they were haunting the past – nothing made Heine feel much in his element.

Craig Broome Hall, a spokesman for Rupavana Speedway, said Haney had a lasting impact on Speedway. He introduced the use of video recording and covered many events himself.

Brownhall said Heaney was always impressed by his love of the game and never sought financial gain.

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“It simply came to our notice then. It was faster than most of us.

Heaney played a key role in the “Speedway Family,” Broomehall said. He was widely known as “Go to Guy” for the footage.

“He was a shy, retiring boy, hiding behind his camera, but using the video camera on the track, he found identity and purpose.

“Its technology has helped young drivers move forward … for the first time ever. [what they were doing] Instead of someone else observing. ”

Heaney met his future wife, Helen Fogarty, in the mid-1960s while living with her brother in a flat in Christchurch - it was love at first sight.

Justin Heaney / Supply

Heaney met his future wife, Helen Fogarty, in the mid-1960s while living with her brother in a flat in Christchurch – it was love at first sight.

Heine, a talented cameraman and father of four, died. At home on June 6 at the age of 75.

He was widely known as a speedway fanatic – inspired by the moment his father took him to Aranui Speedway in the early 1950s.

The track ran for 10 years, closing in 1959, but the spirit he created in Heaney persisted for a long time.

The Ropona Speedway opened two years later. For more than 50 years, Heaney has attended hundreds of meetings there.

Heine at the Speedway Grand Prix in Auckland

Justin Heaney / Supply

Heine at the Speedway Grand Prix in Auckland

His devotion was unwavering. According to his son, Justin Heaney, once, in the 1970s, he had a car accident while attending a meeting and was taken to Christchurch Hospital for a checkup. A few hours later he was discharged, and went straight on track.

For almost 25 years, Hayne has been known as the video man of Ropona Speedway, filming meetings and providing footage to racers who wanted to hone their skills.

“It simply came to our notice then. He really loved the game and did his best to help promote the game locally, “said Justin Heaney.

“After each meeting, he would come home and review what was filmed in a matter of hours, making sure the tape was ready for dubbing and collecting from competitors over the next week.”

Calvin and Helen Heaney with their daughters Donna and Karen.

Justin Heaney / Supply

Calvin and Helen Heaney with their daughters Donna and Karen.

Heaney was particularly passionate about solo speedway bikes and filming. Former world champion Ronnie MooreSunday sessions in West Melton for many years. He also mentored some aspiring young local riders.

In 1989, he filmed, edited and co-produced. Ronnie Moore – Legend is alive. – A documentary, narrated Barry Briggs, On Moore’s life and brilliant racing career.

“Documentary With great effort, Calvin used two VHS players side by side in his spare time. Play, pause, rewind, record,” said Justin Heaney. “It was a labor of love.”

“The final product was sold internationally through Speedway Star. Magazine is the only documentary made in the UK and to date about Ronnie’s career.

Calvin Heaney got some music on his Walkman cassette player in 1982 with sister Vanessa.

Justin Heaney / Supply

Calvin Heaney got some music on his Walkman cassette player in 1982 with sister Vanessa.

During the 1990s, Haney and his son Justin co-produced some national championship events on the Ruapuna track, and the club eventually built a loud video box to accommodate it. He also set up live video feeds of action inside club rooms, and served as club secretary for several seasons.

Justin Heaney said hundreds of Heaney’s catalog tapes could be found carefully attached to the walls of his “human cave” away from the family home’s garage.

In recent years, Haney has compiled some of his favorite all-time races from his extensive tape collection and uploaded them to YouTube. They collected more than 200,000 views.

Through his work, he made an international follower, and kept in touch with many Speedway Pan friends, especially in the UK.

Calvin Heaney poses with his first car in 1965.

Justin Heaney / Supply

Calvin Heaney poses with his first car in 1965.

He traveled abroad to watch high-speed races. After retiring in 2015, he participated in three World Championship Grand Prix events in Poland, Wales and Slovenia.

“He couldn’t be happier. It was Calvin in his element,” Justin said.

Heaney was born on April 29, 1946, to parents Donald and Audrey Heaney. He was the eldest of eight children living in New Brighton. He attended North New Brighton Primary School and Shirley Boys High School.

As a boy, Haney loved nature. They enjoyed many family picnics on the peninsular Bank Price Valley, where they spent hours catching cockroaches in rocky rivers and exploring the hills above the Catuna Valley.

Calvin and Helen Heaney were married on September 10, 1966 in Dunedin.

Justin Heaney / Supply

Calvin and Helen Heaney were married on September 10, 1966 in Dunedin.

After receiving Bird Avery as a gift, young Heaney also fell in love with animals. He spent hours on the weekends and after school catching gold finches and green finches. As an adult, he made his own plant, and kept a wide range of birds.

He also took fish, built his own tank that acted like a tropical microclimate, and had many exotic species.

Justin Heaney said the hobby was “a form of meditation and comfort for him in later years.”

Calvin was an expert in many words, and had an almost encyclopedic knowledge of the Latin names of various birds, fish, and plants, which he could easily remove in conversation.

Heaney met his future wife, Helen Fogarty, in the mid-1960’s while living with her brother in a flat in Christchurch. It was love at first sight.

The couple married in Dunedin on September 10, 1966 and had four children: Donna, Karen, Bridget and Justin. After the marriage they returned to Christchurch. Helen began nursing at Burwood Hospital and bought her first home in Caris Brook St., at the beginning and end of the old Aranui Speedway.

Haney with British Speedway rider and former World Speedway Champion Tai Woofunden.

Justin Heaney / Supply

Haney with British Speedway rider and former World Speedway Champion Tai Woofunden.

Heaney began his career as a clerk in the railway office before starting work. Aulsebrooks Biscuit Factory. On the corner of Montreal and St. Asaf streets.

He was a clerk in the municipal electricity department for many years, and also worked for a time in a small cleaning company for financial reasons.

Heaney and her young family moved to Geraldine in the 1980’s when she got a job managing a local TAB. It bounced around several other southern islands, TAB, and ended back in Christchurch. It was hard work – it was targeted by several armed Holdups.

Speedway enthusiasts are celebrating their 75th anniversary.

Justin Heaney / Supply

Speedway enthusiasts are celebrating their 75th anniversary.

Heaney eventually moved to Papua New Guinea, where he worked as a bar manager and resident graphic designer with his sister Iona and his lifelong friend Kevin Murphy until he retired in 2015.

He is survived by his wife Helen, children Donna, Karen, Bridget and Justin and siblings Santra, Michelle, Vanessa, Brett, Iona and Natalie.

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